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Promoting Workplace Wellness

A recent poll stated that approximately 41% of Americans make New Year’s resolutions.  In that same poll the number one New Year’s resolution for 2017 was to lose weight and live a healthier lifestyle.  These numbers show that your team members are conscious about their health.  So how do you turn resolutions into habits?

This is the perfect time of year to introduce or reinvent your company Wellness Program.  Employee wellness is often seen as a personal issue, but there tangible benefits for businesses to promote health and wellness.   U.S. healthcare costs are predicted to rise 6.5% in 2017 and cost sharing between businesses and employees continues to accelerate.

Wellness Programs can contribute to lower healthcare costs, reduce absenteeism and decrease workers compensations claims.  Research shows that employees who take part in Wellness Programs are more engaged and more productive.  Here are a few ideas your business can use to create excitement and promote healthy lifestyles.

Host a Wellness Expo

An event dedicated to understanding employee benefits and healthy living creates excitement and comradery.  Make sure to promote the event with fun, consistent messaging that explains event activities and overall goals of the expo.  Here are some activities to include in your plan:

·         Cooking Demos

·         Wellness Challenges

·         Interactive Fitness Sessions

·         Biometric Screenings & Flu Shots

·         Raffles

·         Health food snack giveaways

·         “Wear your work out wear to the office” day

Create a Wellness Rewards Program

Creating a wellness rewards program is another great way to promote healthy living.  The idea is simple: incentivize your employees for healthy lifestyle choices.   Set up wellness benchmarks, ask employees to track participation and when a certain threshold is met, they receive a wellness incentive. Offer monetary rewards or reduction in insurance premiums for completing preventative care screenings, biometric exams or completing tobacco cessation programs.   Create a program to promote and track fitness or wellness activities and offer rewards at different levels. For example complete four activities, get a T-shirt, at eight activities a gym bag, and be entered into a grand prize raffle at twelve activities.  Here are some ideas to get you started:

·         Participate in an organized walking, running, or cycling event

·         Get a flu shot or give blood

·         Have your teeth cleaned

·         Coach a youth sports team

·         Participate on a sports team: softball, basketball, kickball

·         Go to an aerobics class or work out at a gym

·         Go for a hike or walk

·         Eat balanced, healthy meals for 1 week and keep a food diary

Partner with Health Experts

Identify non-profit health organizations in your community to share health information.  Organizations like the American Red Cross, the American Cancer Society and Diabetes Foundation have downloadable toolkits, information sheets and other resources available at no cost. Invite a speaker to a lunch and learn at your business or participate in a fundraising event.

How does your company promote Wellness?  Please share your ideas and suggestions with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

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Four Ways to be a Better Communicator in 2017

Successful leaders know that effective communications are a competitive advantage.  As you begin 2017, make a resolution to evaluate the health of your employee communications. Are business goals and actions aligned? Do employees understand priorities and do they have a way to participate and share ideas?

Everyone talks about the importance of communications, but it’s just lip service without an actionable plan.   Here are four ways to commit to better communications in 2017.

1) Map out your communications calendar right now—Begin with a “Welcome to 2017” message. Schedule dates for the entire year now to ensure it remains a priority. Keep the content fresh with a mix of performance results, customer and employee stories, and encouragement.  We all need more of that.

2) Articulate the vision— If a customer asks an employee what your business was about, what would they say? Everyone on your team should use the same headline.  When people can connect their work to big goals, they are more engaged.  Leaders who communicate the vision and values, then put those values into action, see performance climb.

3) Use stories to make an impact—Think back to the most recent story that struck a chord with you.  Was it complicated or overstuffed with facts?  Simple stories make an emotional connection with the audience and hold their attention.  Use your own experiences to make a point.  I recently heard the president of a large hospitality group say that he makes time for fitness daily because “We only get one set of parts and I want mine to last.”  That’s memorable and tells me something interesting about him. Leaders who share a little of themselves in communications are viewed as credible and human.

4) Get visual—Visuals are processed 60,000 times faster than text.  If you rely on email as your primary form of communication, know that there is a better way. In 2016, there were 4.6 billion cell phone users in the world and most phones have video or photo capability. Your team members are viewing or creating visual media every day. Use photos and video as frequently as you use memos. Video is an excellent way to improve message retention, connect with remote workers, and engage senior leadership with teams.  The best part is you don’t have to have a large budget or be an on-camera pro.  If you’re sincere, it will be memorable.

That will get you started.  Need some help in communications planning for 2017?  Get in touch.

Five Ways to Build Engagement through Year-End Communications

 

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This time of year, a kind of holiday haze sets in. The breakroom counters are bursting with tins of holiday cookies and flavored popcorn.  Employees are focusing on completing 2016 assignments (and scheduling holiday getaways).

December marks the fiscal year-end for many businesses.  Help your employees successfully navigate through the many December deadlines with proactive communications that show you care about more than the bottom line.  Here are five tried-and-true ways to do it.

1.       Clarify year-end deadlines.  Start your team meetings with a reminder or checklist of deadlines for invoice processing, Flexible Spending Accounts, finalize expense reports, and other year-end deliverables. This messaging should begin December 1 and continue through the month.

2.       Communicate vacation benefits. Paid time off is treasured by employees. If your business has a “use it or lose it” vacation policy, remind team members so they can schedule time off before year-end.  If your company allows vacation accrual, communicate the accrual limit. Ensure there are no surprises in January.

3.       Come together through service. Studies show that volunteerism increases pride, commitment and employee engagement.  Contact a local charity, food bank or civic association for ideas on how your team can get involved during the holidays.

4.       Celebrate 2016 achievements. Create a top ten list of your team’s “Greatest Hits of 2016” or ask team members to talk about one thing that helped them be successful this year. Connect the dots to show how every role contributes to delivering performance and your company’s vision.

5.       Say thank you.  To make a connection that lasts, send a personal note of thanks. Low cost, big impact. Be sincere and make it personal by including a strength or a behavior the individual brings to the team.

Ten Inspiring Movie Quotes about Communications

wizard-of-oz-photoBefore you craft your next message, take a look at these and enjoy.

  1. “When you are telling stories, have a point. It makes it much more interesting for the listener.” Planes, Trains and Automobiles, 1987
  2. “Don’t use seven words when four will do.” Oceans Eleven, 2001
  3. “Learning to listen, that takes a lot of discipline.” Forever Strong, 2008
  4. “Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking.” Wizard of Oz, 1939
  5. “Avoid using the word very because it’s lazy. A man is not very tired, he’s exhausted.  He’s not very sad, he’s morose. Language was invented for one reason, to woo women. And in that endeavor, laziness will never do.” Dead Poet’s Society, 1997
  6. “The Internet’s not written in pencil, Mark. It’s written in ink.” The Social Network, 2010
  7. “Whoever tells the best story, wins.” Amistad, 1997
  8. “You must write your first draft with your heart. You rewrite with your head.  The first key to writing is to write, not to think.”  Finding Forester, 2000
  9. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.” To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962
  10. Everybody has to sell a little. You’re selling them this idea of you, you know, you’re sort of saying trust me, I’m, um, credible.” Broadcast News, 1987

Everyone likes a good story. Here’s how to build one.

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“They just don’t get it.”

That’s the refrain of business leaders when employee performance doesn’t match expectations, or when a new initiative is greeted with a collective yawn.  Employees must be too busy, disengaged or distracted to understand why this is important, right?

It’s a common predicament. Perhaps it’s not the audience, but the message.

There’s a far better way to engage internal audiences, and it doesn’t include handing out T-shirts and coffee mugs. Use storytelling to make an emotional connection.

We’ve been taught that “correct” business communications isvery detailed, data driven and cost/benefit oriented. It’s a proven formula. However, when the goal is to inspire action, introduce change, or persuade, storytelling is more effective. It helps ideas stick.

You know this is true. It’s how myths and legends are born.  It’s why we share the same stories around the table at Thanksgiving or at reunions with old friends. It’s why the business origin stories for Coca Cola or Spanx are fascinating.

Engaging employees through storytelling binds them together in a shared experience. It’s a method anyone can use. Here are four tips to help you get started:

Start with the end in mind.  What do you want your team to believe and do after they hear the story? Identify the objective and build the story around it.

Set the scene. A strong introduction is the key to a solid story. Engage the audience with a personal experience, a struggle or make an employee the hero.

Simplify.  Twitter has taught us that we can make a point in 140 characters. A strong story, just like a good joke, adds just enough details to advance the story.  Too much detail and you’ve lost them.

Be authentic. Use conversational language.  Share something about you. The power to persuade is lost if the story sounds like it’s lifted from a user’s manual.

Need some help telling your story?  Get in touch.