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Category: Performance Management

Four Ways to be a Better Communicator in 2017

Successful leaders know that effective communications are a competitive advantage.  As you begin 2017, make a resolution to evaluate the health of your employee communications. Are business goals and actions aligned? Do employees understand priorities and do they have a way to participate and share ideas?

Everyone talks about the importance of communications, but it’s just lip service without an actionable plan.   Here are four ways to commit to better communications in 2017.

1) Map out your communications calendar right now—Begin with a “Welcome to 2017” message. Schedule dates for the entire year now to ensure it remains a priority. Keep the content fresh with a mix of performance results, customer and employee stories, and encouragement.  We all need more of that.

2) Articulate the vision— If a customer asks an employee what your business was about, what would they say? Everyone on your team should use the same headline.  When people can connect their work to big goals, they are more engaged.  Leaders who communicate the vision and values, then put those values into action, see performance climb.

3) Use stories to make an impact—Think back to the most recent story that struck a chord with you.  Was it complicated or overstuffed with facts?  Simple stories make an emotional connection with the audience and hold their attention.  Use your own experiences to make a point.  I recently heard the president of a large hospitality group say that he makes time for fitness daily because “We only get one set of parts and I want mine to last.”  That’s memorable and tells me something interesting about him. Leaders who share a little of themselves in communications are viewed as credible and human.

4) Get visual—Visuals are processed 60,000 times faster than text.  If you rely on email as your primary form of communication, know that there is a better way. In 2016, there were 4.6 billion cell phone users in the world and most phones have video or photo capability. Your team members are viewing or creating visual media every day. Use photos and video as frequently as you use memos. Video is an excellent way to improve message retention, connect with remote workers, and engage senior leadership with teams.  The best part is you don’t have to have a large budget or be an on-camera pro.  If you’re sincere, it will be memorable.

That will get you started.  Need some help in communications planning for 2017?  Get in touch.

Engaging Millennials: Three Ways to Do It

Generally when people describe me they say that I’m loud. As if that were somehow the word that completely defines and describes my entire personality. And sure, I am pretty loud, but I am also confident, collaborative, adaptive, and achievement-oriented. I’m many other great things too, but when people don’t know me, or how to talk to me, I come across as just loud when I have the potential to be so much more.

Now, you’re probably wondering what my personality has to do with your business. Well, I’m a Millennial.

As Millennials, we’re better known for our diverse population, relationship to technology, community-based social dynamics, and confident personalities. But, what you might not know about us is that our numbers are growing. The percentage of millennial employees in the workplace is increasing rapidly; by 2020 Millennials will be 46% of the U.S. workforce. What this means for you is that it’s time to figure out a way to better communicate with us so that we can work together to create business success.

Diane Speigel, CEO of The End Result, a corporate training and leadership development company, reports that these are three things Millennials want from their employers:

  • Coaching. We were raised in a society and an academic system that coached us through everything. Therefore, we seek the same kind of coaching and feedback in our careers. We enjoy being recognized for our successes and we are genuinely open to criticism; we want to do it right.
  • Collaboration. We work best in teams and believe in a flexible information flow. We’ll ask a lot of questions and take time to discuss before we begin a project because our groups work best when the purpose of our project is clear and understood by everyone.
  • Motivation. Meaningful work is what drives us; our biggest concerns regarding work is that it’s purposeful and provides us with a sense of accomplishment. We want the opportunity to learn and we need to understand why we’re performing a certain job; we need an explanation of how our contribution will affect the bigger picture.

Need more help communicating with your millennial employees? We can help you create ways to connect. Visit our website www.insight-communication.com or email us at Maureen.Clayton@insight-communication.com

3 Ways to Improve Mid-Year Performance Reviews

We’re almost at the time when managers begin scheduling mid-year performance reviews with their employees.  The purpose of these meetings is to have a face-to-face conversation about how the employee is progressing in delivering performance goals and what support they need from their manager.  It’s a plan that makes sense unless the following happens: a)    The manager is too busy to schedule the meeting, so it doesn’t happen. b)   The conversation goes something like this:  “How’s everything going?  Keep up the good work.  Next.” c)   Neither the manager nor the employee has prepared for the conversation.

Performance management has a profound impact on employee engagement.  The process helps employees understand what’s expected of them and drives personal accountability and pride.Graphic of conversation: "Let's Talk About You." "Awesome."

At one point in my career, the corporation I worked for reorganized, eliminating most middle management roles.  This meant I had more than 20 direct reports.  It could take a week to complete individual performance management meetings.   I admit I did a fair amount of grumbling about it. Yet what I learned was that my team members looked forward to those meetings.  It was their time in the spotlight — a time to talk about themselves. Think about it:  how often do you have time to talk about your accomplishments with your manager?  When can you talk about your career aspirations or share a story of work well done?  If it’s not happening on a regular basis already, mid-year review meetings create an opportunity. Here are three things you can do to improve mid-year performance reviews:

  1.   Build in lead time.  For a meaningful conversation, both you and your employee need time to review the employee’s annual goals, completed work and any performance gaps. Be sure to allow time for both of you to do that.
  2.   Focus on strengths.  It’s easy to focus on the imperfect.   Effective managers talk about what each individual brings to the team. Accentuate the positive in each employee. Research from Gallup shows that when employees know and use their strengths, they are more engaged and deliver better performance.
  3.   Ask how you can lend support. Coach team members who are struggling.  Be specific on areas that need improvement. Even high performers need to know that you support them, so don’t skip this step with them.

Here’s a final tip.  Don’t let the performance management cycle be the only time you speak individually with your team members.  Check in often, so that you know more about them than just their job description.  When employees know and trust their managers, engagement and performance soar. How have you engaged with your employees in the past? Share your story with me!  Contact Maureen at mclayton@insight-communication.com