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Integrating Video into your Internal Communications Strategy

If you’re like us, you’re always looking for ways to get your message across in a new, unique, and interesting way.   One communication channel that you might not have considered is video.  Video is fast becoming the preferred channel for internal audiences because it’s the way we all consume information. Some news outlets have moved exclusively to video content and most include a video with any written content they publish.  Today’s workforce has become accustomed to learning and acquiring information through video content.

Many of your colleagues are visual learners and video content helps simplify complex information and drives engagement when you communicate your message.  Think about it. Which is more appealing– an email memo from the CEO or a quick 3-5 minute video where he or she speaks directly to your employees?

Research shows that people remember more of what they see and hear than what they read.  Video grabs your attention and is more engaging than plain text.  Seizing and retaining your audience’s attention is crucial.  When you have their attention, they’ll retain the message.

Here are some options to consider when implementing videos into your Internal Communications strategy:

  • Online training videos or tutorials
  • Monthly or quarterly updates from your leaders
  • Announcement videos for new programs or initiatives
  • Recognition videos for company milestones or exemplary achievements
  • Employee interviews and testimonials
  • Videos of companywide events, such a community service day or group activity

Now you might be thinking, “I’m not a technical person” or “That would be too difficult to implement,” but it really isn’t.  New technology has simplified video creation, editing and sharing to the point where anyone can do it.

Keep your videos short with a clear message.   There are really no limits or restrictions to how you incorporate video content into your company’s communication plan.  Think outside the box and see what ideas you can come up with.

Does your company use video content in its internal communications?  Share your experiences and ideas with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

Supporting and preparing your colleagues during times of crisis

According to the National Weather Service, 2017 was a “hyperactive and catastrophic hurricane season”.  With over 3,000 deaths and $282+ billion dollars in damages it was the costliest ever in death toll and destruction.  We all remember the three major ones – Harvey, Irma and Maria and the harm they caused.

Just this week it was announced that another major storm will make landfall.  Hurricane Florence is expected to hit the coast of North Carolina this weekend and with its arrival many millions of people will be displaced and there is potential for major damage to countless homes and businesses.

It’s important that in times of crisis your business is prepared with a plan of action to communicate with employees and stakeholders.  Whether it’s a hurricane, tornado, blizzard or other natural disaster always ensure the wellbeing of your employees as they are your company’s most important asset.

  • Develop an emergency response plan with information for business offices with evacuation routes, emergency contacts, and safety procedures for your employees
  • Close your offices well in advance
  • Set up a crisis hotline or contact page where employees can get updates and stay connected
  • Make sure data backup systems are operational and fortify your office area before the disaster hits
  • Form a relief group to help recovery efforts or set up a relief fund for those effected by the disaster

Does your company have an emergency response plan? Please share your insights and ideas with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

Building Brand Loyalty through Smart Social Media

The term bridezilla is not flattering but can be accurate.

Recently Courtney Duffy, a grad student at Dartmouth, booked a JetBlue weekend flight to her friend Alex’s wedding.  (She was one of the bridesmaids).  When the bride found out Courtney couldn’t stay through Monday, she emailed her and asked her to step aside and to mail her the garment so a replacement bridesmaid could wear it.

Courtney posted the exchange on Twitter with a plea to JetBlue to refund her airfare.  They did that and more. In four hours, they posted this on Twitter:

“Hey Courtney, we’ve been thinking.  The jumpsuit may have been borrowed, but we’ll bring the (Jet)Blue.  When you’re ready to patch things up, we’d like to help make your old friendship feel like a new.  A future girls’ weekend is on us.”

The story just begs for a follow up.  Will Courtney and Alex reconnect as BFFs? Can they find a replacement bridesmaid in time (and can she fit in Alex’s jumpsuit)?

The clear winner is JetBlue.  Here’s why:

  • They monitored social media channels and responded quickly
  • They delivered on the customer’s request for a refund
  • They showed the brands’ personality. Encouraging the former pals to reunite for a girls’ weekend is an unexpected and positive twist to the story.

The go-fast, digital era we’re living in requires businesses to pay attention to social media channels and act quickly.  It’s a PR game changer.  JetBlue was able to respond within a few hours to Courtney’s challenge and sweeten the deal.  That nimble response reveals their social media team is empowered to act.  In many businesses, in the time it took for internal approvals, the opportunity would have vanished, and so would the PR benefit.

When brands engage and act humane, customers respond with loyalty.  Interested in accelerating your social media presence?  Let’s connect.  Maureen.Clayton@insight-communication.com

How to Rally Internal Audiences Around Your Culture: A World Cup Story

If you’re like me you can’t get enough of the World Cup.  It’s an event that I look forward to every four years.  I have vivid memories of watching the U.S. national team play in the World Cup. You don’t forget waking up at 2 a.m. to watch the 2002 World Cup in Japan and Korea or standing in a packed bar in Auburn, Alabama watching the 2010 USA vs Algeria game.  These are moments that I will never forget.

But on October 10, 2017 the U.S. team lost 2-1 to Trinidad and Tobago and was officially eliminated from the 2018 World Cup.  This was a major disappointment, but I refused to let it ruin my World Cup anticipation.  All I needed was a new team to get behind.

This was an easy decision.  The club team I support, Tottenham Hotspur, plays in England and their star player, Harry Kane, is the England captain.  I was all in on England.   I began to learn about their national team fan culture, songs, traditions, and slogans.

If you watched the U.S. team play in the last World Cup I’m sure you’ll be familiar with the chant/slogan “I believe that we will win.”  It was easy to remember, it flowed well, and it was very catchy.  By joining in on the “I believe that we will win” chant you identified yourself as a USA supporter.  For England’s supporters “Football’s Coming Home” or simply “It’s coming home” has been the rallying cry.  The slogan has brought all England supporters together and is easily identified as being unique to England.

How do you rally internal audiences and engage them around a common theme or message?  Use these best practices:

  • Develop a slogan or message that is simple and memorable.
  • Be consistent. Use the same message over and over in all your communications.  When you’re just beginning to think you can’t say it one more time, that’s when it will finally get through to someone.
  • Create an engaging visual image.  Visuals are processed 60,000 times faster than text. Your message will be more memorable when a visual is incorporated.

How does your company build engagement? Please share your stories and idea with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

Summer Reading List for Communicators (or Wannabes)

Looking forward to some time off this summer? While you’re relaxing at the beach or enjoying an early start to the weekend with Summer Fridays, make time to sharpen your skills. Each of these books listed below will help you become a more effective communicator and leader.

Inclusion: Diversity, the New Workplace and the Will to Change, Jennifer Brown
This book could not be more timely. Every successful business must ensure that all employees experience a welcoming work environment where they can perform at their best and are challenged to grow. Jennifer shares best practices and business cases that inclusion is an opportunity to make your business better. Share the book with peers at your business and start a conversation.

Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to your Biggest Challenges, Amy Cuddy
You may know Amy from her viral TED Talk where she contends that adopting a power pose, like Wonder Woman, can actually make feel more confident. Her book expands on this premise with practical tips for anyone who has to pitch themselves or their ideas. If you think of a witty retort after the moment passes, this book is for you.

Slide:ology: The Art and Science of Great Presentations, Nancy Duarte
Raise your hand if you’ve sat through presentations that include 50+ slides. For years I wrapped this book up as a holiday gift to clients, hoping they would read it and realize you don’t have to put paragraphs on slides. Nancy Duarte has carved out a unique niche as a presentation expert. If that doesn’t seem very exciting, consider that within corporations, presentations are the most used channel for delivering information. This book will help you strategize the story, content, and flow to impact and influence your audience.

Sell with a Story, Paul Smith
We can all agree that storytelling is a powerful communications tool. But it takes practice to create stories that instruct, inspire and ignite action. Smith provides fascinating examples on you can take even the most technical, data-driven content and fashion a memorable story.

What are you reading this summer? Send me your picks: Maureen.Clayton@insight-communication.com.

How to Save the Audience from Your Terrible Presentation

 

 

 

 

 

This is a true story.

We recently prepared a presentation for a client that had more than 100 slides…for a one hour meeting. Do the math: If you calculate time for introductions and leave even five minutes at the end for questions, that’s a pace of two slides per minute during the presentation. A blistering pace.

Then consider the content on the slides: lots of words, tables, and occasional graphics.  Typeface size was 18 to 28 point.  You get the picture.  The intent was to hammer home thousands of ideas and facts. The client could not be swayed.  They needed every one of these slides to deliver a successful presentation. They just wanted us to “make it pretty.”

I wish I could say we used our magical powers of persuasion to enlighten them to use a strategically messaged, visually compelling presentation.  Didn’t happen.  I did wonder what it was like in the room for the audience… and the presenter.  I imagine they were both exhausted when it was over.

Presenters often start with a bunch of slides and try to cram them into a narrative—and it shows. The most effective presentations look simple because they were planned that way.

When your objective is to communicate, educate or influence, the most important work starts with the result in mind:

  • What is the point you’re trying to make or what must the audience learn?
  • Why is it important to the audience?
  • What story can you use to bring the material to life?
  • What do you want them to do with the information?

Every presentation should tell a story or take the audience on a journey. This applies even if you’re sharing quarterly returns (some of the most important stories). Once you identify your objective, develop the slides that are clear and compelling.  Be concise. Use as little text as possible.  Because you don’t want them to be reading your slides, you want them to be listening to you.

Then practice, practice, practice.  The more comfortable you are with the information, the less you’ll need to rely on slides.  Your audience will be grateful.

Do your presentations need a tune up?  Connect with us and we’ll help you transform from boring to brilliant.  Get in touch: maureen.clayton@insight-communication.com.

Growing Employee Engagement on Earth Day

Consumers today are more environmentally conscious than ever.  Businesses are learning that sustainability and environmental awareness can drive purchase decisions.  A recent study found that 58 percent of consumers consider a company’s impact on the environment in purchase decisions and are more likely to pick companies that practice sustainable habits.

Your employees care about this too.  Earth Day is April 22 and is an excellent opportunity to showcase your company’s eco-friendly initiatives and promote green behaviors with employees.

Here are a few easy-to-introduce tactics that can reduce your business carbon foot print, save money and build engagement with employees:

  • Promote your company’s recycling and green programs.
  • Ask for volunteers for a “green team” to make recommendations about green initiatives.
  • Incentivize carpooling or car sharing programs for employees.
  • Promote electronic document usage to reduce paper waste.
  • Host a lunch and learn with a guest speaker from a community or government organization to discuss emerging technologies or eco-initiatives in your area.
  • Provide recycling collection areas and educate employees about what can be recycled.
  • Instead of stocking disposable water bottles, provide employees with reusable water bottles with your company logo.
  • Sponsor a community clean-up day just for employees.

What is your company doing to promote green initiatives?  Please share your stories and idea with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

Avoid Disaster When Launching New Employee Programs

I was watching a movie the other night (Jurassic Park III, underrated movie in my opinion) and there was a conversation between two of the main characters that stood out for me.

Billy “You have to believe me, this was a stupid decision, but I did it with the best intentions.”

Dr. Grant “With the best intentions? Some of the worst things imaginable have been done with the best intentions.”

Now in this case, Dr. Grant was talking about building a dinosaur theme park that ended up getting hundreds of people killed. On a smaller scale, businesses sometimes make decisions that end up backfiring with undesired consequences.

Business Insider published an article recently highlighting a perfect example of this.  United Airlines announced they were making a change to their employee incentive program.  Rather than using the existing quarterly performance and attendance-based bonus program they were moving to a lottery- based bonus program.  Eligible employees would be entered into drawings for various prizes if the company hit performance goals during that quarter.  The news did not go over well.  Very shortly, United President Scott Kirby announced that they would be “pressing pause” on the new system after negative feedback from employees.

“Our intention was to introduce a better, more exciting program, but we misjudged how these changes would be received by many of you. So, we are pressing the pause button on these changes to review your feedback and consider the right way to move ahead.”

There was an obvious disconnect between the decision makers at United and their employees. In retrospect, this is something that could have easily been avoided.  When introducing a new internal program, particularly one that employees are passionate about, be sure to understand what your employees value and take steps to prepare them for the change.  Seeking input and instituting change management best practices will help ensure that new initiatives are launched successfully.

Employee Surveys

Conducting an employee survey is a low cost effective method to gather information on employee priorities and areas that need work.  Conduct an employee survey annually or use spot surveys for immediate input before launching a new program.

Focus Groups

Before rolling out new programs, test the concept through focus groups.  This will give you a good idea of how new programs will be received and identify any potential problems before launch.

Institute a Soft Launch or Pilot Program

Test the concept in one functional area or with a user group over a specified period of time.  This will give the pilot group time to ask questions and give feedback before the full program launch so the program can be tweaked before full launch.

Sometimes an idea looks great of paper but simply doesn’t work in practice.  Being prepared will make the entire process easier.  Get out in front of any potential problems and create a plan that simplifies the information with a clear and consistent message. How does your company communicate new programs? Please share your ideas and stories with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

After #MeToo: Communicating Your Workplace Harassment Policy

In the wake of widespread media reports of sexual harassment, what is your business doing ensure a safe and accountable workplace?  Consider this: the #MeToo hashtag was shared more than 1 million times in just 48 hours after being posted to social media. The public debate continues as others are empowered to share their stories.

This is not a new issue. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, 94% of U.S. companies have harassment and/or bullying policies that outline conduct that is prohibited. But if you think having a policy is enough, think again.  A 2016 EEOC study of workplace harassment revealed that policies alone do not encourage appropriate behavior. The study reported that approximately 90% of survey participants who experienced sexual harassment never file a complaint.

This is a unique, timely moment to be very clear about workplace harassment. It benefits everyone to make this a priority in your business. When employees experience a safe and welcoming workplace, they perform at their best and drive business performance.  As you review this issue internally, consider these communication best practices.

Review and update the existing Harassment Policy

Start by examining the current policy. When was the last time it was reviewed and updated?  If it’s been more than five years, it’s too old.  The policy should, at a minimum, list examples of prohibited conduct, detail the process for reporting objectionable conduct, and be signed by the current CEO. Then ensure that the policy, and the reporting process, is accessible.  Bottom line: let employees know where to go for help.

Time for leaders to speak out

Every leader must be accountable. Let employees hear directly from the C-Suite that harassment will not be tolerated. Human Resources can support this endeavor, but can’t shoulder it alone. Executives must step up and commit that when allegations are brought, they will be investigated immediately and that appropriate actions will follow.  Convey that retaliation is prohibited since many cases are unreported due to fears of job loss or reprisals.

Train. Train. Train.

Most companies provide online harassment training, but do you mandate that training is completed? Is harassment addressed in new employee orientation? Training will ensure a better understanding of the behaviors that comprise harassment. Additionally, the HR team must be prepared and ready to conduct prompt, objective and thorough investigations.

Amplify the message through internal communications

If an employee experiences sexual harassment–or witnesses it–do they know what steps to take? Make it easy for individuals to report. Use multiple channels to share the harassment policy and reporting procedure. Talk about it in town halls, blogs, create a video from the CEO and put a link to the policy on the home page of your company intranet. Make it loud so that everyone understands that harassment is unacceptable in your company culture.

A Thought as We Welcome 2018

The first week after the holidays is always painful.  So here’s something to lift your spirits.  Our first bit of advice for 2018 is from the master essayist Emerson who has deeply influenced leaders, thinkers and communicators for more than 100 years.  Tuck this away for when you need some inspiration.

“Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year.”

-Ralph Waldo Emerson