Blog

Category: Leadership

Employee Engagement: Still Low

Gallup’s latest study on employee engagement revealed the awful truth that only about 3 in 10 American workers are truly engaged in their work and workplace. Following the havoc of the pandemic, leaders are struggling to inspire team members to take initiative, commit to their company’s success, and be more productive.

The long-running survey on engagement has shown that employees are engaged when their deeper needs to feel valued, grow and develop, maximize their strengths and make a meaningful contribution are fulfilled.  

The results of Gallop’s studies point to three specific things employees need to feel good about their jobs and be fully engaged. Here are some suggestions communications teams can use to make these three elements work for your company:

  1. Employees want a leader and a company who care about them and their development– When you truly believe employees are the company’s most valuable asset, it shines through in the frequency and manner with which you communicate with them. Let them know specifically how the company is working hard to ensure their success. Share information about important changes and initiatives as freely as possible to show employee how their contributions matter to overall business success.
  2. They’re looking for a role that matches their strengths– Every job presents interpersonal and character growth opportunities. Help employees see what mountains they can successfully climb right now and show how they can gain skills and experience on their career journey.
  3. They want to know that their contributions matter– Chances are, your employees believe—or once believed—in your company’s mission and values—what you contribute to the world at large. Keep this purpose at the core of your communications. Be sure you regularly articulate the relationship of the work employees do every day to your mission.

What’s the connection between all of these elements?  Proactive, inspiring, and consistent internal communications. It’s the most productive way to get everyone focused on priorities and engaged in their work.

Communications That Help Employees with Return-to-Office Anxiety

While your office may reopen soon, the pandemic is not over for many employees. Return-to- office communications should help employees feel safe, seen and supported.  Their needs have shifted during the long work from home period.  That’s why effective communications can go a long way to build trust and let them know their health and well-being is important to you. 

Whether you’re moving to a hybrid work arrangement or expect employees back at their workstations in-house, the way you communicate will impact employee engagement. We’re counseling our clients to focus on the Big Three for re-entry communications:  safety, well-being, leadership.

Make your commitment to safety visible

Employees can’t perform if they don’t feel safe. Be clear about steps undertaken to maintain a safe in-office experience, including the deep cleaning of the facility, protective equipment availability, or health checks.  Are masks required? What changes are coming to the break rooms? Set up an online Coronavirus Info Hub where employees can get information, news or policy changes. Being specific about this is more important than ever before. 

Prioritize well-being

Many companies are broadening their wellness programs to focus on mental health maintenance and self-care. Employee Assistance Programs (EAP), often an under-utilized resource, are being more urgently promoted within benefits communications.  Consider providing access to guided meditation apps like Headspace or Calm.   Mental health apps, like Sanvelo and Moodfit, provide support for stress, anxiety and other issues.

Train and support front-line leaders

Train your managers and front-line supervisors with a comprehensive workplace re-entry plan. Ensure they understand any key changes in policy as well as safety protocols. Equip them to support team members with empathy.  Supply guidance on regular check ins as well as fun activities like safe team bonding experiences, virtual happy hours and curated playlists.  And don’t forget to praise good work and say thank you to managers.  This group has been through a lot too.

Looking Ahead: Communicating in a Hybrid Workplace

One of the key takeaways of the past 16-months is that work from home is no longer a perk, but rather the future for many businesses. The hybrid workplace, where employees are co-located and have the ability to work remotely, is a hot topic, particularly with employees. A recent survey from SHRM revealed that 52% of respondents would like to continue to work remotely forever while 35% would accept a pay cut to work from home.

The shift to hybrid working means that companies have the opportunity to reset the workplace culture in many ways.  But the tenets of pre-pandemic employee engagement have not changed. Communication continues to be the key to ensuring alignment and building company culture. Here are four recommendations we’re making to clients.

Conduct a health check for online collaboration tools

When the pandemic hit, businesses moved quickly to stand up collaboration tools that would keep employees connected and working productively.  As hybrid workplaces evolve towards permanency, now is the time to assess how these tools are working and if remote workers have the right support and infrastructure for the long haul. If you don’t know how well they are working, survey employees now.

Create consistent person-to-person connections

Whether through group or individual online sessions, every remote employee should have a regular touchpoint with his/her manager.  This ensures understanding of expectations and opportunities for feedback. Engagement lags when employees think their manager does not know, or care, what they do.  Consistent interaction helps to build pride and performance.

Reimagine employee onboarding

The first 90 days in a new role is a pivotal time that can set up an employee for success or failure. Learning a new role while working remotely can feel isolating.  Put practices in place to ensure the new employee understands the role, who to go to for support, and where to learn about the mission and culture of your workplace.  Show your team personality with online Welcome party or a Hi There kit with company swag.  Most importantly, give the new hire something to do and help prepare them to contribute.

Make recognition visible

The days of bringing everyone together for cake to celebrate a win or a milestone may be gone, but don’t skimp on saying thank you. Research indicates that when employees feel recognized and valued, they tend to be more satisfied, are more productive, and are more likely to engage with the rest of the team. Reevaluate your company recognition program with a lens on remote workers so that everyone knows their contributions are celebrated.

Sixty Seconds of Leadership Inspiration

During graduation season, you can count on speakers, the profound and the superficial (I’m looking at you reality show celebs), to make a connection. Their goal is to inspire others to reflect or take action or celebrate.

As leaders and communicators, we’re also looking for a spark to lift and embolden us in our work. Here are some of our favorite quotes. Take a break from Zoom call fatigue and use them to jumpstart your storytelling and communications.

 “Waiting for perfect is never as smart as making progress.”

Seth Godin

“I believe in the power of storytelling because stories open our hearts to a new place, which opens our minds, which often leads to action.”

Melinda Gates

“Be unafraid to be completely you, and accept all those other individuals you meet as they are.”

Alicia Keys

“Before dreaming about the future or making plans, you need to articulate what you already have going for you—as entrepreneurs do.”

Reid Hoffman

 “Good writing does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else’s head.”

Malcolm Gladwell

“Failure is not something to be ashamed of; it’s something to be powered by. Failure is the highest octane fuel your life can run on. You got to learn to make failure your fuel.”

 –Abby Wambach

“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.”

Warren Buffett

As you enter positions of trust and power, dream a little before you think.”

Toni Morrison

Celebrating Black History Month at Work

February is Black History Month, a time to reflect, celebrate and learn about the heritage and significant contributions of Black Americans. Although many businesses are operating in work from home settings, there are many ways to engage employees in programming and spark meaningful conversations about racial justice that extend well past February.

Educate and spark dialog. Host a conversation series with guest speakers on topics such as Black culture, trailblazers and social justice. Encourage all employees to live your corporate values by educating themselves on racial injustice. Invite Black leaders within your company to share their career stories and talk about leadership development.

Connect and engage. Establish Employee Resource Groups, employee-led organizations focused on fostering an inclusive workplace and aligning with business objectives. ERGs are a powerful tool in employee retention, engagement, and development of future leaders.

Involve employees in brand and internal storytelling.  Do your communication channels, recruiting and marketing materials look as diverse as your employee population?  Employees are the most credible brand ambassadors, both internally and externally.  Create new ways to showcase your employees and their stories.

Start a Leadership Book Club. Use the Lean In model as a template for a Company Book Club. Select at book, and create a company-wide reading event culminating with a moderated discussion with a company leader. Looking for inspiration?  Here are some amazing books:

  • How to Be an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi
  • “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents” by Isabel Wilkerson
  • “Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement” by John Lewis and Michael D’Orso

The NAACP offers guidelines on what brands can do for Black History Month .  This includes focused recruiting efforts of diverse leaders, supporting diversity and inclusion programs within your business and engaging with local social justice organizations.

Developing a Return-to-Work Communications Strategy

As businesses across the country begin to reopen following Covid-19, employees will need to feel safe and understand what to expect in new ways of working.  While some businesses have extended telecommuting through the summer, that’s not an option for everyone.  If you decide to reopen your business, here are some strategies to keep in mind.

Make Safety Visible

For employees to focus on their jobs, they must feel safe.  Federal and state agencies have issued guidance on safe practices, including social distancing, frequent hand washing, and cleaning and sanitizing of workspaces.  But these are mostly voluntary.   Show employees that you care by communicating safety procedures at your business.  Make it inescapable: posters, signage, emails, intranet pop-ups. Provide personal protective equipment at no cost to employees.  Review and update your telecommuting policies. Ensure your managers practice and encourage uptake of new well-being processes.

Communicate Constantly

The new normal is going to be confusing for a while.  That’s why it’s so important that the business leadership is aligned, communicates proactively, and walks the talk.  Train front-line managers on new working practices and talk about what you expect from them. The manager who doesn’t comply will be very easy to identify.  Ensure there are two-way communication channels so that employees can surface issues and obtain rapid responses. Use pulse surveys to identify issues that are creating concerns. Now is the time to be visible, encouraging, and also transparent about the business challenges and what how employees can help.

Support Mental Health

Six months ago most people could not imagine daily life during a global pandemic.  Unfortunately, now we all can. Your employees may have experienced the virus themselves, lost a loved one, know a friend or family member who is unemployed, or struggled with isolation or family issues.  Now is the time for empathy.  Show it in your leadership communications and encourage managers and supervisors to do the same.  Emphasize the availability of counseling benefits or Employee Assistance Programs.  Make it easy to ask for help.

There is not one prevailing roadmap through these challenging times, but employees want to hear from you.  Communicate and manage sensitively. Be human.

Internal Communications Best Practices for the Pandemic

By now, some of us have been working from home, sheltering in place for six weeks and it’s not clear when we’ll return to work as we experienced it before. Unprecedented is too small a word to use to describe the toll: 2.7 million coronavirus cases globally and 26 million Americans have filed jobless claims.

Now more than ever, communications from company leadership is key to building trust and maintaining focus. In many businesses, leaders are working around the clock to determine a path forward. Proactively communicating with employees must be part of that strategy. Here are some practical tips to keep your team members connected and focused.

1.      Start with Compassion

Many of your employees have been affected by the virus. Whether impacted personally by illness, caring for family or friends, supervising home schooling, or taking care of children, everyone is dealing with something. Be concerned about employees’ and health and safety. Direct them to Employee Assistance Programs and other company-sponsored benefits. Provide a sincere thank you to everyone keeping things moving for the business and your customers. Be human and sincere.

 2.      Be Clear about the Way Forward

Things are bad everywhere and everyone knows it. Communicate the steps being taken to preserve the health of your business. Identify the biggest challenges and what the leadership team is doing to address them. Be positive about what is working well. Ask everyone to encourage and support colleagues and customers, in ways big and small. Show pride and share stories of how your people support the community and each other.

3.      Empower Two-Way Communication

People consume information in different ways, so use all the channels available to your business. Resources like blogs, email, video, and the company intranet are effective, but also provide a way to collect and encourage feedback from team members. Make it easy to access. Ask for ideas on redeploying resources, increasing efficiency, and creatively solve problems. When employees feel heard, they perform well.

4.      Lean on Line Managers

This is the time for your line managers to shine. While online town halls and video conferencing from leaders are essential to provide clarity, the most credible source is the manager. Prepare managers with talking points so the message is clear and consistent.

Need help with internal communications?  Get in touch: Maureen.clayton@insight-communication.com

Three Internal Communication Fails and How to Fix Them

A recent conversation with a smart, successful corporate leader has me still shaking my head. He was reflecting on the lack of urgency and so-so performance of some of their teams. “They just don’t get it,” he said. “I don’t know how we can get through to them.”
It doesn’t take the investigative powers of Sherlock Holmes to identify a disconnect between the business strategy and employee performance. The failure here is not on the part of the employees, it’s the communications strategy.
Sustained communications remind everyone of what you’re trying to achieve together. Here are three frequent internal communication fails and how to fix them:

No consistent communications
Without communications, employees create their own narrative. No matter what channel works best for your business, choose a communications timetable and stick to it. Ad hoc doesn’t work. The message doesn’t need to be long, or over-produced. Sometimes an update, or a checklist or outlook for the next 30 days is enough. When weeks and months go by without a message from the leader, don’t expect employees to think things are OK.

No clarity on the big picture
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American works 44 hours per week, or 8.8 hours per day. Wouldn’t it be great if everyone was focused on the same goals? A survey by Weber Shandwick found that only four in 10 employees can describe what their employer does and only 37% know the company’s goals. Ugh! Leaders must be relentless in connecting people to purpose by clearly communicating the company purpose, mission and goals. Just when you’re sick of talking about it, you’re reaching someone for the first time.

Relying on email as your go-to channel
We’ve been talking about the death of email as an effective internal communications tool forever, but the dominance of millennials in the workplace should finally do it in. Every generation has a communication preference and the future is digital. If you’re relying on email to communicate with employees, you’ve got a problem. Add other channels to your communications mix and consider cloud-based products like Slack, GSuite or Microsoft teams.

Looking for ways to improve clarity, alignment, and trust with your employees? Need some help with that? Get in touch: Maureen.Clayton@insight-communication.com

Lessons from Apple’s Decision to Kill iTunes

When iTunes debuted 18 years ago, it was a radical concept.  Don’t buy the whole album; pay 99 cents for the one song you like. Get a thousand songs in your pocket!

Apple made the announcement this month that it would move to three individual dedicated apps for music, podcasts and TV. Users can maintain their iTunes libraries and choose to subscribe to Apple Music. Pundits agreed it was the right move, even though it’s the end of an era.

Think about your business communications:  what channels or practices do you need to put the brakes on?

Sometimes we stick with a communications process or channel because it’s comfortable.  It’s worked in the past.  It’s a no brainer to produce it.  But it takes a bit of courage to realize that what worked before isn’t working now or is not sustainable in the future.  Change can be unsettling, but it’s also troubling to find out your newsletter or intranet or CEO blog is ineffective because it has no audience.

Ready to evaluate your internal communications strategy? Get in touch with me: maureen.clayton@insight-communication.com.

Integrating Video into your Internal Communications Strategy

If you’re like us, you’re always looking for ways to get your message across in a new, unique, and interesting way.   One communication channel that you might not have considered is video.  Video is fast becoming the preferred channel for internal audiences because it’s the way we all consume information. Some news outlets have moved exclusively to video content and most include a video with any written content they publish.  Today’s workforce has become accustomed to learning and acquiring information through video content.

Many of your colleagues are visual learners and video content helps simplify complex information and drives engagement when you communicate your message.  Think about it. Which is more appealing– an email memo from the CEO or a quick 3-5 minute video where he or she speaks directly to your employees?

Research shows that people remember more of what they see and hear than what they read.  Video grabs your attention and is more engaging than plain text.  Seizing and retaining your audience’s attention is crucial.  When you have their attention, they’ll retain the message.

Here are some options to consider when implementing videos into your Internal Communications strategy:

  • Online training videos or tutorials
  • Monthly or quarterly updates from your leaders
  • Announcement videos for new programs or initiatives
  • Recognition videos for company milestones or exemplary achievements
  • Employee interviews and testimonials
  • Videos of companywide events, such a community service day or group activity

Now you might be thinking, “I’m not a technical person” or “That would be too difficult to implement,” but it really isn’t.  New technology has simplified video creation, editing and sharing to the point where anyone can do it.

Keep your videos short with a clear message.   There are really no limits or restrictions to how you incorporate video content into your company’s communication plan.  Think outside the box and see what ideas you can come up with.

Does your company use video content in its internal communications?  Share your experiences and ideas with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com