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Category: Technology

Six Secrets to Trade Show Success

Exhibiting at a trade show is a great way to get some face to face time with potential customers.  Recently our company attended a national conference and trade show in Las Vegas.  It was our fourth consecutive year exhibiting at this trade show and many of the same companies we see every year were in attendance.  Some of the exhibitors always do a fantastic job, while others are missing the potential to maximize their ROI.

Here are six best practices that that you can use when preparing for and attending your company’s next trade show:

  1. Start preparing well in advance. Getting a jump on your trade show prep is vital.  Send out a preconference email to the list of attendees, map out your show strategy with your exhibit team, create product/service sales sheets, take care of any printing needs for handouts and schedule equipment and promotional item shipping.
  2. Make sure your messages are clear and consistent. The most common question I get at trade shows is “So what do you guys do?”  Each member of your sales team should be able to give a 30 second response to this question.   Determine how you want to promote your company, create an elevator speech, and make sure everyone is on the same page.
  3. Keep the messaging on your display and signage short and readable. Trade show participants move through the exhibit floor pretty quickly. All of your signage should be easily readable from the front of your booth.   One mistake that I often notice is when exhibitors cram too much information onto their signage or use fonts that are too small. Provide just enough information to make attendees stop and ask questions.
  4. Always provide giveaways. Who doesn’t like free stuff?  Providing a giveaway will draw more traffic to your booth and is a great conversation starter.  Always include your company logo or name on the product. It will remind potential customers of your interaction when they visited your booth after the conference.
  5. Stay active on social media. Most conferences will promote a hashtag to use throughout the event. Post photos, give updates, announce speaking sessions and promote your booth number using the conference hashtag.  This is a great way to drive engagement. Don’t forget to post a thank you to everyone who stopped by your booth after the conference.
  6. Schedule a post conference wrap up meeting.  It’s important to get feedback from your team while the conference is fresh on their minds.  What worked, what didn’t work? What questions did the attendees have?   What were your strongest leads and what are the next steps for contacting these potential customers?  All of this information will give you a head start when planning your next trade show.

Do you have any trade show tips? Share them with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

Integrating Video into your Internal Communications Strategy

If you’re like us, you’re always looking for ways to get your message across in a new, unique, and interesting way.   One communication channel that you might not have considered is video.  Video is fast becoming the preferred channel for internal audiences because it’s the way we all consume information. Some news outlets have moved exclusively to video content and most include a video with any written content they publish.  Today’s workforce has become accustomed to learning and acquiring information through video content.

Many of your colleagues are visual learners and video content helps simplify complex information and drives engagement when you communicate your message.  Think about it. Which is more appealing– an email memo from the CEO or a quick 3-5 minute video where he or she speaks directly to your employees?

Research shows that people remember more of what they see and hear than what they read.  Video grabs your attention and is more engaging than plain text.  Seizing and retaining your audience’s attention is crucial.  When you have their attention, they’ll retain the message.

Here are some options to consider when implementing videos into your Internal Communications strategy:

  • Online training videos or tutorials
  • Monthly or quarterly updates from your leaders
  • Announcement videos for new programs or initiatives
  • Recognition videos for company milestones or exemplary achievements
  • Employee interviews and testimonials
  • Videos of companywide events, such a community service day or group activity

Now you might be thinking, “I’m not a technical person” or “That would be too difficult to implement,” but it really isn’t.  New technology has simplified video creation, editing and sharing to the point where anyone can do it.

Keep your videos short with a clear message.   There are really no limits or restrictions to how you incorporate video content into your company’s communication plan.  Think outside the box and see what ideas you can come up with.

Does your company use video content in its internal communications?  Share your experiences and ideas with me: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

Building Brand Loyalty through Smart Social Media

The term bridezilla is not flattering but can be accurate.

Recently Courtney Duffy, a grad student at Dartmouth, booked a JetBlue weekend flight to her friend Alex’s wedding.  (She was one of the bridesmaids).  When the bride found out Courtney couldn’t stay through Monday, she emailed her and asked her to step aside and to mail her the garment so a replacement bridesmaid could wear it.

Courtney posted the exchange on Twitter with a plea to JetBlue to refund her airfare.  They did that and more. In four hours, they posted this on Twitter:

“Hey Courtney, we’ve been thinking.  The jumpsuit may have been borrowed, but we’ll bring the (Jet)Blue.  When you’re ready to patch things up, we’d like to help make your old friendship feel like a new.  A future girls’ weekend is on us.”

The story just begs for a follow up.  Will Courtney and Alex reconnect as BFFs? Can they find a replacement bridesmaid in time (and can she fit in Alex’s jumpsuit)?

The clear winner is JetBlue.  Here’s why:

  • They monitored social media channels and responded quickly
  • They delivered on the customer’s request for a refund
  • They showed the brands’ personality. Encouraging the former pals to reunite for a girls’ weekend is an unexpected and positive twist to the story.

The go-fast, digital era we’re living in requires businesses to pay attention to social media channels and act quickly.  It’s a PR game changer.  JetBlue was able to respond within a few hours to Courtney’s challenge and sweeten the deal.  That nimble response reveals their social media team is empowered to act.  In many businesses, in the time it took for internal approvals, the opportunity would have vanished, and so would the PR benefit.

When brands engage and act humane, customers respond with loyalty.  Interested in accelerating your social media presence?  Let’s connect.  Maureen.Clayton@insight-communication.com

How to Save the Audience from Your Terrible Presentation

 

 

 

 

 

This is a true story.

We recently prepared a presentation for a client that had more than 100 slides…for a one hour meeting. Do the math: If you calculate time for introductions and leave even five minutes at the end for questions, that’s a pace of two slides per minute during the presentation. A blistering pace.

Then consider the content on the slides: lots of words, tables, and occasional graphics.  Typeface size was 18 to 28 point.  You get the picture.  The intent was to hammer home thousands of ideas and facts. The client could not be swayed.  They needed every one of these slides to deliver a successful presentation. They just wanted us to “make it pretty.”

I wish I could say we used our magical powers of persuasion to enlighten them to use a strategically messaged, visually compelling presentation.  Didn’t happen.  I did wonder what it was like in the room for the audience… and the presenter.  I imagine they were both exhausted when it was over.

Presenters often start with a bunch of slides and try to cram them into a narrative—and it shows. The most effective presentations look simple because they were planned that way.

When your objective is to communicate, educate or influence, the most important work starts with the result in mind:

  • What is the point you’re trying to make or what must the audience learn?
  • Why is it important to the audience?
  • What story can you use to bring the material to life?
  • What do you want them to do with the information?

Every presentation should tell a story or take the audience on a journey. This applies even if you’re sharing quarterly returns (some of the most important stories). Once you identify your objective, develop the slides that are clear and compelling.  Be concise. Use as little text as possible.  Because you don’t want them to be reading your slides, you want them to be listening to you.

Then practice, practice, practice.  The more comfortable you are with the information, the less you’ll need to rely on slides.  Your audience will be grateful.

Do your presentations need a tune up?  Connect with us and we’ll help you transform from boring to brilliant.  Get in touch: maureen.clayton@insight-communication.com.

Our Holiday Gift to You: Five of Our Favorite Business Communication Resources

With a dizzying number of tools, apps and online resources available to business communicators, it can be difficult to keep up.  Here are five of our favorites; our go-to sources for inspiration, innovative design and fresh ideas.  Happy Holidays!

Creative Market— Creative Market is an online marketplace for community-generated design assets. The website sells graphics, WordPress themes, stock photography, and other digital goods.  If you are building infographics, there are thousands of icons to choose from. www.creativemarket.com.

Grammarly—Unlike cursive handwriting, correct grammar never goes out of style. Grammarly’s  writing app helps ensure your writing is easy to read, effective, and mistake-free by automatically detecting grammar, spelling, punctuation, word choice and style error. It’s available as a free Chrome extension or online at www.grammarly.com.

HBR IdeaCast—This weekly podcast by the Harvard Business Review features leading thinkers in business and management.  What’s the connection to communications?  Great leaders understand the value of communications and alignment with corporate values.  There are lots of clever ideas to nab here. Available on Apple Podcast and www.HBR.org.

Ted Talks—Everyone needs a 15 minute mental vacation from the daily grind.  Watch a Ted Talk.  Our recommendation for business communicators is Talk Nerdy to Me by Melissa Marshall.  In less than five minutes she outlines a formula for bringing scientific content to a general audience. Use this approach whenever you’re sharing complex (or boring) information. www.TedTalks.com

Unsplash—There is no better site for beautiful, free images and photos than Unsplash. You can download high resolution files to use for any project. No attribution required (although always appreciated).  Just spend 10 minutes scrolling through the photo files and you’ll be inspired to improve the look of your presentations or handouts. www.unsplash.com

Listen Up: Try Podcasts in your Internal Communication Mix

Looking for a new way to reach your employees without blowing your entire budget?  Try podcasts. If you think it’s a niche channel, take a look at these numbers:

  • 4 in 10 Americans listen to podcasts on a regular basis
  • Podcast listening was up 23% between 2015 and 2016
  • 85% of listeners complete the entire episode*

Americans are falling in love with podcasts in numbers that increase every year. Recent podcast phenoms like Serial and S-Town attracted legions of new listeners. Guess what? Many of your employees are among them.

Internal communication pros are paying attention. Disney, IBM and Microsoft have added podcasts to their internal mix.  Perhaps it’s time for your business to do the same.

Consider these three things when developing a podcast strategy (or selling the idea to your boss).

  1.   Accessible everywhere.  What’s the one item most people can’t do without?  Their phones.  A podcast will allow you to connect with team members as they multitask: at the gym, on a walk, in the car. With the average daily commutes now at around 26 minutes each way, podcasts provide alternative listening content.  Smart speakers (think Alexa, Google Home, or Siri) are now in 20 million Americans in live in homes, providing another channel for podcasts.
  2.   Builds community. Engaging employees who work at remote locations or in non-desk roles is always a challenge. So is communicating across global time zones.  Podcasts are a viable alternative. It’s like being in a conversation, as if the speaker is talking directly to you.  There’s an intimacy that can’t be delivered in a company newsletter.
  3.   Shows your company leaders are human. Your CEO may be smart, but would you like to have a beer with him or her?  Effective leaders know the value of storytelling and conversation.  A series of podcasts with the senior leadership team will give employees insight into the personalities that lead the business and where the company is going.  It can help align people around  your business priorities.

* Source:  2017 Infinite Dial Study, Edison Research

Impress your clients with data like Spotify

Image of Spotify logo via Insight Strategic Communications of Roswell, GA

If you’re a regular reader of our blog here at Insight Strategic Communications, you will know that we love two things: Telling our clients’ stories and doing so in a cost efficient way.

That’s why I loved what Spotify did when they unveiled their “Year in Music” infographic series this month. But before I dive into this, I need to explain a little more about Spotify first.

That insight is exactly what Spotify used when it compiled its year in music. Who were the most played artists? More interestingly, who were the most played artists during the summer? And even more interesting, who were the most played artists in Scotland on Sept. 18, the day the country voted to remain part of the United Kingdom? These are fascinating small details that open our eyes to the coolness of data mining.For those unaware, Spotify is a commercial music-streaming service, like Pandora, except that it allows users to search for any song, artist or genre in their vast catalogue to play on demand (Pandora does not allow users to select specific songs, only “stations.”) So while Pandora users are more likely to discover new music through the stations they listen to, Spotify users are more likely to know what they want to listen to and play their favorite songs. This is important, because it gives Spotify more specific insight into each and every one of their users.

But where Spotify really nails it is the personal infographic that I can see about myself, or that you can see about yourself. Every Spotify user is able to see their own data, whether you pay for Spotify’s premium service or not. In reviewing my personal Year in Music, I learned things I never knew about myself (I use Spotify the most on Friday, for example). Bottom line — Spotify used data to tell a story about me. That is cool.

I was once told by a business leader, “If we can tell our client more about them than they know about themselves, I can pretty much guarantee they are going to trust us and want to do business.” Spotify has done exactly this, and all using information they already tracked. Their biggest costs were probably to web designers who made the info attractive and available — a small price to pay when it comes to making a personal connection with millions of customers.

We can all learn from this. Is there anything we can learn from our customers by looking back on our work for them? It’s the end of the year, so it’s a good time if you have a break in work to evaluate your data and make your plans for 2015. If you think it’s time for a fresh approach for the upcoming year and need some help, get in touch at joe.patrick@insight-communication.com.

Developing Your Social Media Strategy

Social media is changing the way we communicate.  We’re learning a new language with new phrases and symbols.  Businesses are speaking directly, to larger audiences than ever before.  With these new opportunities, you need to ask yourself a few questions.  What should I share with my audience? What platforms should I use and how can I utilize those platforms? What should my social media strategy be?

Image of social media globe

When deciding what you want to share through social media, you must first establish a voice that is consistent with your company.  What is the overall objective of your social media plan?    Don’t blog, post or comment about legal matters at your company.   Ensure that employee social media use complies with your company culture and ethics.  Don’t use photos unless you have the rights to use them.  It is very important that you trust the people who are in charge of controlling your social media because once something is posted into the public domain there is no turning back.  If you’re not careful you could end up with a very public dilemma on your hands (e.g. US Airways this past week).

Facebook is the most used social media website in the world.  Because of this, Facebook is a great place to start.  Use Facebook to interact with your audience and share information.  Encourage them to sign up for e-mail updates or contests.  Ask your followers questions and track their feedback.   Facebook can also be used as “home base” to promote your other social media platforms.  One tip to consider when using Facebook is to keep posts short (80 characters or less), if your post is too long your audience will glance over it.  A second tip is to consider the timing of your post.  To get the most engagement from you post, post it between the hours of 8 pm-7 am and post on the weekends.  At the time of this blog post, statistics show that posts made during these times will get the most engagement.

Twitter is another social media platform that you can use to your advantage.  Again timing is a key factor when deciding when to post.  Twitter “followers” are almost 20% more likely to engage with your tweets on weekends, yet only about 20% of brands tweet on weekends.  Hashtags can be used like “campfires.” Users can search your hashtag to view what others users who have used your hashtag are saying.

A few companies that are excelling at social media include Zappos and Groupon.  Both have found the value of using social media not only to sell, but to engage customers in conversation.  They interact, collect feedback, and discover what their customers really want.  Take some time to explore social media and find the right mix of platforms and tactic for your business.

What do you think? Share your story with Ben: ben.clayton@insight-communication.com

 

Using Instagram as a Corporate Tool

What do you think of when you hear the word “corporate?” Tailored suits, boxy skyscrapers, and leather briefcases are a few things that come to mind for most. That conception is often deceiving.

Image of social media icons on a phone including Instagram

Corporate workplaces can be vibrant and cultured spaces. If you need proof, find photos of the corporate offices for companies like Google, Apple and Microsoft.

And that’s where Instagram comes in. The app gives us a medium to share our company’s core values in a way that’s fun, engaging, and human. Obviously we don’t all have the resources to spend lavishly on our office buildings like the “giants.” We can’t Instagram a slide in our office that goes from the HR break room to Reception. However, we can Instagram the delight on a colleague’s face after he or she acquires new business with a client.

The role of Instagram isn’t to show off, per se, but to share what your company is all about. When we think of it as a “tool,” it’s easy to be too strict with its usage.  Go ahead, take that photo of some colleagues at a sporting event. Instagram the great holiday treats a client dropped off for you in the break room. Just please don’t Instagram your lunch.

I often hear conversations held by Gen X’ers or older about how to engage the Millenials. Well, as someone who is right on the edge of their generational borderline, I can say this: They’re more willing to support a company that they feel shares a similar set of values. Whether those values be social, moral or political, Instagram offers a way to share who you are.

Remember, don’t Instagram your lunch!

What do you think? Share your insights and ideas with Joe: Joe.Patrick@insight-communication.com

Social media image courtesy of Jason Howie under Creative Commons license.

Wake Up and Embrace Social Media

Illustration of a media tree including social media

A wise man once said, “Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.”

Technology is constantly changing the way we do business.  Bulletin boards and memos are being replaced with social networks and instant messages.

This may be a good time to take a minute and assess what your company is doing to utilize social media to tell your story.  It might seem like a daunting task to modify your internal communications methods with all the new technology that is available, especially to those of you who may not be particularly tech savvy.  Don’t fear!  Technology is your friend.

New social tools can enhance employee engagement, improve internal communication and promote teamwork.  Here are a few inexpensive, easy-to-use tools that will help your company increase efficiency and consistency.

Social Networks- Social networks are not just for your customers: they give employees a venue to collaborate and share information instantaneously with large groups of people. Some other useful features include event planning, networking, and promotion.

Podcasts- Podcasts are an effective way to add a personal touch to your internal communications.  Some useful applications for using a podcast include instructional messages, information sharing and tutorials.  Slides and graphs can also accompany podcasts to improve comprehension.

Video Conferencing- As business goes global, video conferencing has become more widely used. Face to face communication keeps your audience more engaged and can also incorporate any non-verbal messages.      

Instant Messaging- Instant messaging is a highly efficient form of communication when collaborating with other employees or co-workers. IM’ing is popular, especially with young team members, and reduces wasted time responding to emails and waiting for responses.

What do you think? Share your insights and ideas with Ben: Ben.clayton@insight-communication.com